Sunday Jan 21

Neely Poetry Caitlin Neely is an MFA candidate at the University of Virginia. Her work has been published in DIAGRAM, Sixth Finch, Thrush Poetry Journal, Devil's Lake and elsewhere. She is the founder of The MFA Years and the editor for Reservoir Journal.

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Come Spring, Come Flesh, Come Bright Earth


I.


Enna is full of geese. Horses pour through the meadows,
their mouths muzzles of light. She is not allowed
to touch them. Only watch as they fade to poppies.
She bathes in Pergusa, the bank heavy with monarchs.
Her hair grazes mud & silt, water purls around her feet.


II.

In her mouth
vegetation, crickets.
Wingéd throat.

Her body a holler,
field of fish
dense with night.


III.


Persephone                              full of longing                         and dark gulls

this is not the sea.                    Your face                                in the earth,

your mother                             waiting for you,                      calling for you.

In spring,                                 you return to                           the hills,

the grain,                                 her. How                                 ethereal

you are,                                   she says, how                          new

everything                               is, Hades                                 so far away.




Origin: Eve



Take me by the hand.

The world swollen,

limb-groved, shored up;

now water

green with fish.

All mercy-hum, all

geography. Eyes and eyes

and river. My mouth

excavated, unloosed

of beauty. Here,

our bodies part

like wildness,

darken with trees.

Here, little low heaven,

the eroded blue

spring.





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Notes
“Come Spring, Come Flesh, Come Bright Earth ”: The line “Horses pour through the meadows” is based off of a line from the poem “Black Transit” by Lucia Perillo.
“Origin: Eve”: The line “little low heaven” is taken from the poem “Spring” by Gerard Manley Hopkins, and “the eroded blue” is based off of a line from the same poem.